Elderflower Candied Citrus Peel - candied lemon, candied grapefruit, candied orange, and candied lime in rolled in elderflower infused sugar. Get the recipe at putitinurmouth.com

Elderflower Candied Citrus Peel

Elderflower Candied Citrus Peel - candied lemon, candied grapefruit, candied orange, and candied lime in rolled in elderflower infused sugar. Get the recipe at putitinurmouth.com

It was a lazy and sober afternoon on Sunday when I realized that I should, and was actually capable of, doing something productive.

I thought to myself, “What does one do with free time and sobriety?” Going outside seemed out of the question since Al Gore decided to pull the sun closer to the Earth to spite us for not recycling enough.

(That’s how global warming works right?)

There wasn’t much to do inside the house though, except clean, or organize the closet, or pay my credit card bill, or do my laundry. Obviously I didn’t want to do any of those things, but I knew that if I lingered too long the weight of responsibility would coerce me into it.

I had to find something to do that would take a lot of time, and that’s when I remembered that Sarah and I had invented a responsibility in part to avoid doing actually important things in a deceivingly proactive way: Put It in Your Mouth.

So naturally, in 103 degree weather, I decided to start boiling hot syrups on the stove.

While testing this recipe, I also thought I might try baking the elderflower sugar to see if I could get it to dry faster, but you know, the funny thing about sugar is that it melts.

Which is fine, really. I hate using the oven so much that I loathe to even instruct you to do it, though I couldn’t remember why at the time.

“Beep,” the fire alarm said helpfully. “Beep, beep!”

I’m pretty sure our fire alarm would go off if we took a hot shower with the door open.

I was then forced into opening all the windows in the house despite that it appeared to be the same temperature outside as in the oven.

I blame Al Gore, Ra the sun god, and fire safety for my struggles.

…But it was worth it. Elderflower candied citrus peel is definitely making it to the top of my giftable foods list.


Elderflower Candied Citrus Peel

Elderflower Candied Citrus Peel - using St. Elder elderflower liqueur: elderflower candied grapefruit, elderflower candied orange, elderflower candied lime, and elderflower candied lemon. Get the recipe at putitinurmouth.com

These cute little twirly gigs taste even better than they look. Candied citrus peel is delicious on its own, but elderflower and citrus is an unbeatable combination. The elderflower sugar is also great to dip fresh fruit into too, although the flavor is quite delicate since it’s largely aromatic, so I wouldn’t recommend using it for anything involving high heat.

These also make great gifts since they’re delicious and they sound refined. Nobody has to know that when you say elderflower candied citrus peel, all you did was throw some booze in some sugar.

Also, as a heads up, the completed product will take 12 – 24 hours.

Tools:

  • 2 quart pot
  • Colander
  • Parchment or wax paper
  • Blender or food processor

Elderflower Candied Citrus Peel - candied lemon, candied grapefruit, candied orange, and candied lime in rolled in elderflower infused sugar. Get the recipe at putitinurmouth.com

Ingredients:

NOTE: We used St. Elder elderflower liqueur for this recipe. It’s more floral and potent than bottom shelf brands, but it’s not as expensive as something like St. Germain. I recommend you stay in the price range of about $15 – $20 to ensure the best flavor. Also, although we provided a list of citrus fruits, you can adjust to accommodate more of your favorites.

  • 2 grapefruits, 1 orange, 6 lemons, 6 limes and a partridge in a pear tree
  • 5 cups +2 cups of granulated sugar, plus extra for coating if desired
  • 5 cups water, plus more for blanching
  • 1/2 cup elderflower liqueur
  • OPTIONAL: Wooden toothpicks if making twirls or roses

How to Put It in Your Mouth:

  1. Mix the elderflower liqueur with 2 cups of granulated sugar until evenly coated. Spread the sugar out on a baking sheet or parchment paper, and allow the alcohol to evaporate and the sugar to dry overnight. If it gets clumpy, pulse it in a blender or food processor. Go ahead and candy the fruit  too – that will likely need to sit overnight as well.

  2. Start by peeling the rinds from the fruit. You’ll want to remove the pulp but keep the pith (the white part), which helps absorb the sugar and creates that gel-like texture to the candies. We used the method below to achieve the twirly look, but if you’re feeling lazy, strips will do just fine.

    You can also make roses if you’re feeling fancy. I recommend using limes to do this since the thinner peels are more flexible.

  3. Next, remove the bitterness from the peels. We used this recipe as a guide, but here’s the short of it: doing one type of citrus at a time (to preserve flavor), put the peels in a 2-quart pot and fill with cold water. Bring to a rolling boil, drain, and repeat with fresh cold water.

    Elderflower Candied Citrus Peel - candied lemon, candied grapefruit, candied orange, and candied lime in rolled in elderflower infused sugar. Get the recipe at putitinurmouth.com

    You’ll want to do this 3 times for lemons, 3 times for oranges, 5 times for grapefruits, and 3 times for limes. If making roses, I suggest an additional boiling. You can also test for doneness by taste – if there’s only a faint bitterness left, you’re good to go. [NOTE: if using more than one kind of citrus, this goes a lot faster using multiple pots.]

  4. Now it’s candy time! In your 2 quart pot, heat 5 cups of water and 5 cups of sugar. Simmer until the sugar is completely dissolved, then add your peels, one type of citrus at a time.

  5. Cover and heat the peels at a constant simmer until the pith becomes translucent, anywhere from twenty to sixty minutes, depending on the type and amount of citrus.

  6. Use a fork to remove the peels from the syrup and allow to dry on parchment paper until they feel sticky but not wet before rolling in the elderflower sugar. The thicker the peel, the longer this will take – the grapefruits pictured took a full 24 hours, whereas the lemons were ready in only a 2 to 3. Also, if you cut your peels thick, you may have to reshape them into spirals after taking them out of the syrup, but they should hold their shape when dried.

    After rolling in sugar, store in an airtight container or enjoy right away!

  7. Repeat steps 4 and 5 for additional batches or types of citrus.

Elderflower Candied Citrus Peel - candied lemon, candied grapefruit, candied orange, and candied lime in rolled in elderflower infused sugar. Get the recipe at putitinurmouth.com


Elderflower Candied Citrus Peels

Ingredients:

NOTE: We used St. Elder elderflower liqueur for this recipe. It’s more floral and potent than bottom shelf brands, but it’s not as expensive as something like St. Germain. I recommend you stay in the price range of about $15 – $20 to ensure the best flavor. Also, although we provided a list of citrus fruits, you can adjust to accommodate more of your favorites.

  • 2 grapefruits, 1 orange, 6 lemons, 6 limes and a partridge in a pear tree
  • 5 cups +2 cups of granulated sugar, plus extra for coating if desired
  • 5 cups water, plus more for blanching
  • 1/2 cup elderflower liqueur
  • OPTIONAL: Wooden toothpicks if making twirls or roses

How to Put It in Your Mouth

  1. Mix the elderflower liqueur with 2 cups of granulated sugar until evenly coated. Spread the sugar out on a baking sheet or parchment paper, and allow the alcohol to evaporate and the sugar to dry overnight. If it gets clumpy, pulse it in a blender or food processor. Go ahead and candy the fruit  too – that will likely need to sit overnight as well.

  2. Start by peeling the rinds from the fruit. You’ll want to remove the pulp but keep the pith (the white part), which helps absorb the sugar and creates that gel-like texture to the candies. We made ours into twirls and roses (video tutorials in full recipe above), but if you’re feeling lazy, strips will do just fine.

  3. Next, remove the bitterness from the peels. We used this recipe as a guide, but here’s the short of it: doing one type of citrus at a time (to preserve flavor), put the peels in a 2-quart pot and fill with cold water. Bring to a rolling boil, drain, and repeat with fresh cold water.

  4. Now it’s candy time! In your 2 quart pot, heat 5 cups of water and 5 cups of sugar. Simmer until the sugar is completely dissolved, then add your peels, one type of citrus at a time.

  5. Cover and heat the peels at a constant simmer until the pith becomes translucent, anywhere from twenty to sixty minutes, depending on the type and amount of citrus.

  6. Use a fork to remove the peels from the syrup and allow to dry on parchment paper until they feel sticky but not wet before rolling in the elderflower sugar. The thicker the peel, the longer this will take – the grapefruits pictured took a full 24 hours, whereas the lemons were ready in only a 2 to 3. After rolling in sugar, store in an airtight container or enjoy right away!

  7. Repeat steps 4 and 5 for additional batches or types of citrus.

 

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